Photo-based Social Practice Broadsheet

This is the four-page newspaper we created to share some of the driving questions and ideas with the audience during the panel discussion on socially engaged, transdisciplinary, and expanded practices in contemporary photography at Aperture Foundation in New York as part of the Open Engagement conference in May. Click on the title … Continue reading

Shock and Awe: An interview with Ethan Rafal

I met Ethan when we were artist mentors together at Southern Exposure in 2015. Since then I have watched his practice grow into the world in a way that I find really exciting and that I really relate to. So I asked him if he would let us explore his practice a … Continue reading

SHARED VISION: DIÀNA MARKOSIAN with Rebecca McClelland

The work of Magnum Photos’ Diàna Markosian takes documentary photography into new, collaborative territory where the subject becomes co-creator. Ahead of their interview at PhotoLondon, photographic director Rebecca McClelland talks to Markosian about her process   This article was originally published on CREATIVE REVIEW and is republished here with permission. This … Continue reading

IC-Visual Lab: An evening with Gemma-Rose Turnbull and Pete Brook

  PHOTOGRAPHY AS A SOCIAL PRACTICE with Gemma-Rose Turnbull and Pete Brook. Thursday 18th May 2017, 19:00 £6/4 CONCESSIONS. Free to ICVL Members Dark Studio, 2nd floor, ARNOLFINI BUY TICKETS Gemma used to be a news photographer and came to be focused on collaborative practices that disrupt the linear, documentary … Continue reading

I get the feeling sometimes that photography can be hypercritical and unconstructive in its criticism. When it gets the wind in its sails, it feels like you’re in the midst of  a mass Five-Minute Hate. It’s like the scene in the remake of the Night of the Living Dead where Donald Sutherland points and screams – and then everybody else points and screams. It looks and feels terrible even when there are some justifications for it, especially when there are justificatons for it.  This kind of response is something that also needs to be addressed in photography and its social media responses – because it is an embarassment and one day it will end in something very tragic. It is a form of bullying. Again, it’s nothing to do with photography, it’s to do with basic human behaviour.

The work that Gemma-Rose Turnbull and Pete Brook do is a constructive counterpart to this kind of response. Their work is considered, analytical and creates a counter-voice that is productive rather than reactionary and destructive, and leads us into new ways of seeing how images are made and the different fields in which they operate.

 
– Colin Pantall, Photography as Social Practice. In Bristol this Thursday

Just as media representations of the artist-as-genius have proved remarkably durable, the figure of the lone photographer is an enduring myth.

[The] figure of the intrepid, typically male, photojournalist is tied up with narcissistic fantasies about the photographer-as-lone-adventurer…the photographer-adventurer who bears witness to the world’s most beautiful and horrific truths has become something of an ego ideal or phantasm haunting all users of the camera. Men, apparently, are particularly prone to its seductive power.

– Daniel Palmer

Palmer, Daniel. Photography and Collaboration: From Conceptual Art to Crowdsourcing. London: Bloomsbury, 2017. p.1–2

 

Magnum Foundation Symposium

  The 2017 Magnum Foundation Photography Expanded Symposium will explore collaborative approaches to creative documentary practice.   The Photography, Expanded symposium is an annual full-day event that is free and open to the public. The symposium draws practitioners and storytellers across media to be inspired by exemplary case studies of innovative … Continue reading

Thinking about
who
represents
whom,
and
for whom,
is key to
my practice.

– Helen Cammock is an artist and artist facilitator. She lectures across the UK on participatory practice and is committed to exploring and evolving the way participation opens up dialogue, and aims to ensure that diverse voices are platformed in the cultural contexts she works in.

Participatory photography – Jack of all trades, master of none?

Foreword When I wrote ‘Jack of all trades, master of none’ eight years ago I was just beginning to explore the relationship between photographers and those they picture. Participatory photography (PP) was considered rather hip at the time, partly fuelled by the success of the film ‘Born into Brothels.’ I was … Continue reading

Culture Shifts

Culture Shifts is a new socially engaged photography programme led by Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool, UK and supported by a strategic touring fund from Arts Council England. Working across a host of social housing, local authority culture and health partners and communities across the Liverpool and Merseyside city regions, we … Continue reading

PH15: the Argentine youth photography project

17 years of photography workshops in the same community: A conversation with Moira Rubio Brennan and Miriam Priotti, directors of PH15.     As participatory, collaborative and community-based photography projects proliferate, initiatives that stand the test of time stick out from the crowd.  This is not to say that projects … Continue reading

Landmark Collaborative Work by New Mexico Prisoners and Photographer in the Early Eighties

This article is reposted from Pete Brook’s website Prison Photography     I’ve heard from a couple of folk that when I started Prison Photography, they laughed at its folly. Not only had a bleeding-heart liberal thug-hugger come along to explain a world no-one cared about to no-one in particular, but … Continue reading

Diane Dammeyer Fellowship in Photographic Arts and Social Issues

The Diane Dammeyer Fellowship in Photographic Arts and Social Issues creates a space for a socially-engaged photographer to produce a compelling and dynamic body of work highlighting human rights and social issues.   Fereshteh Toosi, the 2015-16 Dammeyer Fellow, spent her year building relationships with the residents of Leland Apartments, … Continue reading

Round Table: Community Photography, Now and Then.

A round table discussion with several photographers discussing the theme of community photography from Photoworks Collaboration Issue. Topics address questions such as the definitions surrounding collaborative photography practices, an overview of several artistic traditions which have converged in contemporary community photography, and the dynamics between photographer artists and their audiences. … Continue reading

TAKING PART: Participatory Artist In Residence programme

Photofusion host four 90-day residencies for emerging participatory lens-based artists. Photofusion is a hub for photographers of all backgrounds in South London. Working in a diverse and challenging borough since 1992, Photofusion has a proud history of community engagement including work with local schools, young offenders, social housing associations and … Continue reading

“I also struggle with the term ‘participatory photography’ because it is such a broad term and there is so much bad practice. I am going to talk frankly: there is so much bad practice and so many do-good, damaging, crappy, boring projects. I feel like I can’t really speak in this conversation because we are using terms that I don’t think I understand or can define.”

 
– Eugenie Dolberg in a roundtable discussion between Ben Burbridge, Anthony Luvera, Matt Daw, Andrew Dewdney, and Noni Stacey for the Photoworks Annual Issue on Collaboration. “Round Table: Community Photography, Now and Then.” Photoworks Annual, no. 21 no. 21 (October 1, 2013): 126–49 (136).

If You Think You’re Giving Students of Color a Voice, Get Over Yourself

“The idea of “giving” students voice, especially when it refers to students of color, only serves to reify the dynamic of paternalism that renders Black and Brown students voiceless until some salvific external force gifts them with the privilege to speak.” – Jamila Lyiscott   “If You Think You’re Giving … Continue reading

Photography and Collaboration

“…thinking about photography in collaborative terms invites us to reconfigure assumptions about the photographic act in all its stages.”   Dr Daniel Palmer is a writer and Associate Professor in the Art Theory Program in the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at Monash University. His research and professional practice focuses … Continue reading